Accessories from bygone days

Once upon a time family pictures would turn out more horribly than they usually would if it were not for the tungsten filter. Back in those days there wasn't any auto-white-balance or even compact fluorescent bulbs. Most everything indoors was shot under tungsten lighting which one either corrected with a tungsten filter or the dim, yellow light was blasted out with daylight-balanced flash. Tungsten filters would eat almost two stops of light necessitating fast film speeds, wide apertures and admonishing subjects to assume the posture of rigor mortis.

 

Olympus OM-2N camera, Fuji NHG negative film, tungsten filter, 1989.

Olympus OM-2N camera, Fuji NHG negative film, tungsten filter, 1989.

Almost thirty years later we still own the same tungsten filter. Most of the time we have no idea what to do with it. Sometimes we contemplate throwing it away. Sometimes, though, we try it out just for fun to see what will happen:

 

Rolleiflex camera, Fujichrome Velvia 50 film, tungsten filter on Mayaro beach, Trinidad.

Rolleiflex camera, Fujichrome Velvia 50 film, tungsten filter on Mayaro beach, Trinidad.

Moonset at Waterloo, Trinidad, 2013. Rolleiflex camera, Fujichrome Velvia 50 film, tungsten filter. 

Moonset at Waterloo, Trinidad, 2013. Rolleiflex camera, Fujichrome Velvia 50 film, tungsten filter. 

So, although technology marches on, marching in one spot for years at a time isn't too bad all of the time.